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Calvary University’s Evening Lecture Series is designed to provide academic departments the opportunity to present research projects, papers, journal articles, premier classes pulled from the curriculum, or topical discussions within respective disciplines.  The series is open to Calvary faculty, staff, students, alumni, and the public.  A time for questions and discussion will follow each lecture, after which an informal reception organized by the hosting department will provide the opportunity for attendees to engage and, perhaps, further explore the topic at hand.

 

 

Date:

April 14, 2022

Time:

7:00pm

Location:

Calvary University’s Conference Center
Langmade Room
15790 Elmwood Avenue
Kansas City, MO 64147

 

Strengthening the Church through Theological Education

Shaun LePage, Th.M., D.Min. in progress

Shaun LePage

Shaun LePage

Th.M.

Department Chair of Ministry Studies, Assistant Professor of Ministry Studies

Date:

February 10, 2022

Time:

7:00pm

Location:

Calvary University’s Conference Center
Langmade Room
15790 Elmwood Avenue
Kansas City, MO 64147

 

A Biblical Examination of the Concept of Intelligence

Luther Smith, M.A., M.A., Psy.D.

Luther Smith

Luther Smith

M.A., M.A., Psy.D.

Dean of the College, Department Chair of Biblical Counseling, Associate Professor of Biblical Counseling

Date:

December 8, 2021

Time:

7:00pm

Location:

Calvary University’s Conference Center
Langmade Room
15790 Elmwood Avenue
Kansas City, MO 64147

 

Getting to the Point

Joel Williamson, Th.M.

The church tends to use of Old Testament stories to teach morals in elementary Sunday School or to illustrate a New Testament teaching. Only rarely does it deal with the message taught by the story itself. Most stories, however, are told to make a point. In every culture and language group on earth, people use stories not only to illustrate practical lessons, but also inculcate their worldview in the reader or listener. The church, however, often lacks the intellectual tools to deal with stories as anything more than entertainment. This lecture addresses that problem and suggests that a simple application of linguistic theory will help solve it. For example, the material an author chooses to include or exclude, as well as the order and detail in which he presents it, are guideposts to his intended meaning. This lecture will use the New King James version of the story of the sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22:1–19) to provide the listener with analytical tools to apply to his or her study of biblical narrative (or to the reading of other sources of narrative literature).

Joel Williamson

Joel Williamson

Th.M.

Professor of Biblical Languages